What happens after you are diagnosed with uterine leiomyosarcoma?

Posted By on Mar 10, 2016 | 0 comments


Many women in the United States have undergone a hysterectomy or a myomectomy during which a device known as a power morcellators was used to remove noncancerous tissue or fibroids.  Once believed to be a minimally invasive way to remove these tissues, it was soon found that these devices could spread undetected cancerous tissue during these procedures.  According to Williams Kherkher, among the cancers that could be caused are uterine cancer, uterine sarcoma, and endometrial stromal sarcoma, and metastatic leiomyosarcoma. Unfortunately, these cancers can sometimes go undetected following a procedure using a power morcellator if an individual is unable to recognize the symptoms.

Uterine cancer carries a number of symptoms, ranging in severity. According to the American Society of Clinical Oncology, one of the most common early signs of uterine cancer in women is bleeding in between menstrual periods.  The amount of bleeding can range from moderate to light.  This may also include a watery discharge from the vagina that may or may not include a streak of blood.  A woman may also experience pain in her pelvic area, particularly during sexual intercourse.  If a woman has already gone through menopause, a symptom of uterine cancer may include vaginal bleeding again.  If you underwent surgery with a power morcellator and have experienced any of these symptoms, it is important to consult with your doctor as soon as possible to determine if you are suffering from uterine cancer.  Uterine cancer can become aggressive quickly if not diagnosed early.

Despite numerous FDA warnings and a recall, power morcellators have still not been officially banned even following a recall from makers Johnson & Johnson.

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